Tag Archives: Ramadan

A Quiet and Peaceful Ramadhan

Assalaamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu,

Alhamdulillah, all praise is due to Allah, we should all be thankful to have reached another Ramadhan, even if it is a strange one, and that we’re not been among those who we celebrated Eid with after fasting last year, only for them to not reach this month with us again.

After that sad note, and being grateful to Allah I wanted to write about Ramadhan (or Ramadan if you prefer) being so quiet and peaceful this year and how much I feel I am benefiting from this month, this time around, even more so than other years.

Don’t get me wrong, there are obvious and massive benefits in the usual way we go about Ramadhan, with work, fasting and then quickly onto our iftar before going to the Masjid for Taraweeh, before we sleep what little we can, then repeat. It’s a struggle at times, but spiritually rewarding to strive in this way but this year I am finding I am more and more at peace with myself, able to walk with my wife and my children or just by myself, to spend time to think, reflect upon how we are living our lives and what is really important.

We are getting more time also as a family in the home, as I work from desk in the dining room, able to turn and see my kids as they come downstairs on waking up, able to chat with them, knowing them as they grow up that little bit better, or just enjoy seeing them go about their daily lives.

I am also able to give more quality time to my Quran, and not just snatching a few minutes reading on the bus on my mobile phone, and we’re able to pray our salaat together as a family.

So it’s a very different feeling, and one I don’t want to lose when Ramadhan is finished this year as there is really no reason we cannot do many of these things outside of Ramadhan also if we wanted to.

This month is meant to be a time we turn back to Allah, but also one where for 30 days we can build up good habits we wish to continue for the rest of the year.

So this year I want to give myself and my family more time, to reflect on how much of my busy life was really necessary and how much I can give away to gain again this peace and tranquility, rather than falling back into the hustle and bustle of life once the Corona Virus / Covid 19 lock-down is lifted.

I think we’d all find there are large parts of our lives, we simply don’t need and which don’t benefit us, which also come at a cost of losing a little of ourselves and our family life and so let’s use this quiet time during lock-down to reflect and learn to spend our time wisely again.

Assalaamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu,

Gingerbeardman

Goals More Important Than Targets

Assalaamu Alaykum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuhu,

We all have goals in life, we want to be successful in one area or another and not just as believers and achieving success in the next life though of-course that is our primary goal, but we have things we want from the dunya as well and want to do well in life in different ways.

So how do we get there?

Well unless you’re extremely well raised and made up to start with you at first kinda go generally in the direction you think you will need to go to achieve success in one area or another and that sometimes works a little. A lot of people stick with that their whole lives and then wonder why they don’t succeed that much with the really whiny annoying ones then finding someone to blame for their failures.

Some however realise this only takes you so far, that it is not a very effective strategy. So you reflect where you went wrong and realise you need to plan, you need to aim and you need to measure where you are going and how fast you’re getting there, and this is done through targets.

So you want to be rich…

How much do you earn, how much do you want to be earning in each period of your life to get where you want to go on this?

You want to healthy…

So you check your weight and how this is changing as you go through your diet / exercise regime and measure how changes to your lifestyle has affected your weight.

‘Can’t see the wood for the trees’

We can all potentially get so obsessed with our targets and measuring ourselves toward them that we forget the target is only a means not an end in itself.

We run after the target so much, we forget we were only using this as a measure of success, and confuse that with success itself.

So a man wants to be rich, but ends up forgetting wealth is a means to an end so becomes a miser or greedy, or pursues haram means or allows it to warp him so he forgets others or he suffers setbacks so he may end up losing hope of his dreams being fulfilled as he struggles and strives to succeed.

Or in extreme cases someone trying to lose weight ends up becoming anorexic, or having some other form of body dis-morphia or else loses the will to continue as the scales refuse to shift even as they lose inches off their waist and are otherwise feeling fitter and healthier.

This goes for all matters, including our deen and we shouldn’t allow the targets we set get in the way of the goals we are trying to achieve.

So you may want to read the whole Quran during Ramadhan, but you’re a few days in and already your way behind but what if you’ve really benefited from the reading you’ve done?

You’ve learn’t new meanings and acted upon them, surely that was your a bigger move towards your goal of gaining taqwa and understanding from the Quran not just racing through it which was the target you set yourself to get towards that goal?

So I would remind myself and everyone else to yes set yourself ambitious goals, then plan how to bring them about in your life, and how you’re going to measure that success but don’t let that process, or the measuring of it get in the way of what you actually want in life.

We also need to remember that whatever we plan to do, Allah is the best of planners as we are reminded in the Quran, so we need to respect that and that success only comes from Allah, and that if He does not  wish us to achieve a goal, despite our best efforts we should be content  with the decree of Allah.

Assalaamu Alaykum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuhu,

Gingerbeardman

Islam Q&A – Is The Fasting of One who Doesn’t Pray Accepted?

Assalaamu Alaykum,

Every year I ask myself whether I should post this Fatwah up, and every year I do so reluctantly.

Some might argue it’s better the ones who are not praying do something good, but in reality if their fasting and perhaps even the Shahadah is not accepted what is the point of fooling them and the masses?

We need to deal with the bigger evil first, people not praying which is a bigger obligation, and potentially could even cause them to fall into kufr before moving onto fasting.

 

Islam Q&A    https://islamqa.info/en/49698

Question: Is it permissible to fast without praying?

Answer:

Praise be to Allaah.

No good deeds will be accepted from one who does not pray – no zakaah, no fasting, no Hajj or anything else.

Al-Bukhaari (520) narrated that Buraydah said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever does not pray ‘Asr, his good deeds will be annulled.”

What is meant by “his good deeds will be annulled” is that they will be rendered invalid and will be of no benefit to him. This hadeeth indicates that Allaah will not accept any good deed from one who does not pray, so the one who does not pray will not benefit at all from his good deeds and no good deed of his will be taken up to Allaah.

It seems from the hadeeth that there are two types of those who do not pray: those who do not pray at all, which annuls all their good deeds, and those who do not offer a particular prayer on a particular day, which annuls the good deeds of that day. So annulment of all good deeds happens to those who forsake all the prayers, and annulment of the good deeds of a particular day happens to the one who omits a particular prayer.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen was asked in Fataawa al-Siyaam (p. 87) about the ruling on the fasting of one who does not pray.

He replied:

The fast of one who does not pray is not valid and is not accepted, because the one who does not pray is a kaafir and an apostate, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“But if they repent [by rejecting Shirk (polytheism) and accept Islamic Monotheism], perform As-Salaah (Iqaamat-as-Salaah) and give Zakaah, then they are your brethren in religion”

[al-Tawbah 9:11]

And the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Between a man and shirk and kufr stands his giving up prayer.” Narrated by Muslim, 82. And he (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The covenant that separates us from them is prayer; whoever gives up prayer is a kaafir.” Narrated by al-Tirmidhi, 2621; classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Tirmidhi.

This is also the view of most of the Sahaabah, if not their consensus. ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Shaqeeq (may Allaah have mercy on him), who was one of the well-known Taabi’een, said: The companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did not think that omitting any action made a person a kaafir, except for prayer. Based on this, if a person fasts but he does not pray, then his fast is rejected and not accepted, and it will not avail him anything before Allaah on the Day of Resurrection. We say to him: Pray then fast, because if you fast but do not pray, then your fast will be rejected, because acts of worship are not accepted from a kaafir.

The Standing Committee (10/140) was asked: if a person is keen to fast in Ramadaan and to pray in Ramadaan only, but he stops praying as soon as Ramadaan is over, does his fasting count?

They replied:

Prayer is one of the pillars of Islam, and it is the most important pillar after the Shahaadatayn. It is an individual obligation (fard ‘ayn), and whoever does not do it because he denies that it is obligatory, or he does not do it because he is careless and lazy, is a kaafir. With regard to those who fast Ramadaan and pray in Ramadaan only, this is trying to cheat Allaah, and unfortunate indeed are those who only acknowledge Allaah in Ramadaan. Their fasting is not valid if they do not pray at times other than Ramadaan, rather this makes them kaafirs in the sense of major kufr (kufr akbar), even if they do not deny that prayer is obligatory, according to the more sound of the two scholarly opinions.

Islam Q&A

VERY LATE EID GREETINGS!

Eid-Mubarak-Images

 

Assalaamu alaykum readers,

And a belated EID MUBARAK! TaqabAllahu minna wa minkum, May Allah accept from us and from you. OK I’m late, I know but been a bit too busy with family in the past couple of weeks to post anything and the blog is not my full time job or anything so forgive me on that.

So I hope you all had wonderful Eid celebrations and not too many of you spent your time and money throwing a welcome back party for Shaitan as too many do these days, throwing away your good deeds.

If you did… then make tawbah and remember the purpose of Ramadhan. It’s is meant to be time of purification, and I am not talking about a one-month detox before you spend the other 11 months on one big bender kinda-purification. No, instead Allaah states in the Quran:

O you who have believed, decreed upon you is fasting as it was decreed upon those before you that you may become righteous
Quran translation, Surah al Baqarah, 2:183

So now use all those times you got into the habit of making du’a in Ramadhan by doing so again now, asking Allaah to forgive you, follow up an evil deed with a good deed.

On the authority of Abu Dharr Jundub ibn Junadah, and Abu ‘Abd-ir-Rahman Mu’adh bin Jabal (may Allah be pleased with them) that the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessing of Allah be upon him) said: “Be conscious of Allah wherever you are. Follow the bad deed with a good one to erase it, and engage others with beautiful character.”
Related by Tirmidhi

I ask Allaah that he accepts your deeds and my deeds this ramadhan and forgives us our shortcomings, helps purify our deeds and intentions and makes us better believers for the whole year, not just one month, ameen.

Now…

eid over back to work

 

MOON SIGHTING WARS

Don’t worry about those who carry out the moon-sighting wars at the beginning and often all throughout the month of Ramadhan, most of them if questioned cannot even tell you the month, never-mind the date through out for the rest of the Islamic year.

There is validity for both local and global moon sightings, so please stop getting all uptight and doing shaitan’s work for him when Allaah has him locked up.

ISLAM Q&A – TARAWEEH 8 OR 20 RAKATS?

https://islamqa.info/en/9036

Praise be to Allaah.  
We do not think that the Muslims should be so sensitive with regard to issues that are the matter of scholarly differences or make them the cause of division and fitnah among the Muslims.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen  (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, when speaking about the matter of one who prays ten rak’ahs with the imam, then sits down and waits for Witr and does not complete the Taraaweeh prayers with the imam:

It grieves us deeply that we find in the Muslim ummah a group which differs concerning matters in which differences of opinion are acceptable, and they take these differences as a means to cause division. Differences within the ummah existed at the time of the Sahaabah, yet they remained united. The youth in particular and to all those who are committed to Islam must remain united, because they have enemies who are laying in wait. 

Al-Sharh al-Mumti’, 4/225

Two groups have gone to extremes with regard to this matter. The first group denounced everyone who prays more than eleven rak’ahs and said that doing so was bid’ah. The second group denounced those who do only eleven rak’ahs and said that they are going against scholarly consensus (ijmaa’).

Let us listen to what Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:

Here we say that we should not go to extremes or be negligent. Some people go to extremes in adhering to the number mentioned in the Sunnah, and say that it is not permissible to do more than the number mentioned in the Sunnah, and they aggressively denounce those who do more than that, saying that they are sinners. 

This is undoubtedly wrong. How can they be sinners, when the Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), upon being asked about night prayers, said that they are to be done two by two, and he did not specify any particular number? Of course  the one who asked him about the night prayer did not know the number, because if he did not know how to do it, it is even more likely that he did not know the number. And he was not one of those who served the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) so that we might say that he knew what happened inside his house. Since the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) told him how to do it but did not say how many times, it may be understood that the matter is broad in scope, and that a person may pray one hundred rak’ahs then pray Witr with one rak’ah. 

With regard to the words of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), “Pray as you have seen me praying”, this does not apply in absolute terms even for these people. Hence they do not say that a person should pray Witr with five rak’ahs sometimes and with seven rak’ahs sometimes and with nine rak’ahs sometimes. If we understand it in absolute terms, then we would have to pray Witr with five rak’ahs sometimes and with seven rak’ahs sometimes and with nine rak’ahs sometimes. But what is meant by the hadeeth is pray as you have seen me praying with regard to how to pray not how many rak’ahs, unless there is a text to state what the number is.  

Whatever the case, a person should not be strict with people with regard to a matter that is broad in scope. We have even seen some brothers who are strict on this matter accusing the imams who pray more than eleven rak’ahs of following bid’ah, and they leave the mosque, thus missing out on the reward of which the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever stands with the imam until he finishes (the prayer), the reward of qiyaam al-layl will be recorded for him.” (Narrated by al-Tirmidhi, 806; classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Tirmidhi, 646). Some of them even sit down after completing ten rak’ahs, thus breaking up the rows of worshippers by sitting there, and sometimes they start talking and disturb the people who are praying. 

We have no doubt that their intentions are good and they are doing their best to come to the right conclusion, but that does not mean that they are correct. 

The other group does the opposite. They sternly denounce those who pray only eleven rak’ahs and say that they have gone against scholarly consensus. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“And whoever contradicts and opposes the Messenger (Muhammad) after the right path has been shown clearly to him, and follows other than the believers’ way, We shall keep him in the path he has chosen, and burn him in Hell — what an evil destination!”

[al-Nisa’ 4:115]

All the generations who came before you only knew the number as twenty-three rak’ahs, and they denounce anyone who says anything different. 

Al-Sharh al-Mumti’, 4/73-75

With regard to the evidence quoted by those who say that it is not permissible to do more than eight rak’ahs in Taraaweeh, they quote the hadeeth of Abu Salamah ibn ‘Abd al-Rahmaan, who asked ‘Aa’ishah (may Allaah be pleased with her), “How did the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) pray during Ramadaan?” She said: “He did not pray more than eleven rak’ahs in Ramadaan or at other times. He would pray four, and do not ask how beautiful and long they were, then he would pray four, and do not ask how beautiful and long they were, then he would pray three. I said, ‘O Messenger of Allaah, will you sleep before you pray Witr?’ He said, ‘O ‘Aa’ishah, my eyes sleep but my heart does not.’” 

Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 1909; Muslim, 738

They said: This hadeeth indicates that the Messenger of Allaah was consistent in his prayers at night in Ramadaan and at other times.

The scholars refuted this use of the hadeeth as evidence by saying that this is what the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did, but the fact that he did something does not imply that it is obligatory.

The evidence that there is no set number for prayers at night – which include Taraaweeh – is the hadeeth of Ibn ‘Umar according to which a man asked the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) about prayer at night. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Prayers at night are to be offered two by two (two rak’ahs at a time). If any of you fears that the time of dawn is approaching then let him pray one rak’ah as Witr.”

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 846; Muslim, 749)

If we look at what the scholars of the prominent schools of thought said, you will clearly see that this matter is broad in scope and that there is nothing wrong with doing more than eleven rak’ahs.

Al-Sarkhasi, who is one of the imams of the Hanafi school, said:

It is twenty rak’ahs, apart from Witr, in our view.

Al-Mabsoot, 2/145

Ibn Qudaamah said:

The favoured view according to Abu ‘Abd-Allaah (i.e., Imam Ahmad, may Allaah have mercy on him), is that it is twenty rak’ahs. This was the view of al-Thawri, Abu Hanfeefah and al-Shaafa’i. Maalik said it is thirty-six.

Al-Mughni, 1/457

Al-Nawawi said:

Taraaweeh prayer is Sunnah according to scholarly consensus. Our view is that it is twenty rak’ahs with ten tasleems, and it is permissible to pray it individually or in congregation.

Al-Majmoo’, 4/31

These are the views of the four imams concerning the number of rak’ahs of Taraaweeh prayer. All of them said something more than eleven rak’ahs. Perhaps the reasons why they said something more than eleven rak’ahs include the following:

1-     They thought that the hadeeth of ‘Aa’ishah did not mean that this was the specific number.

2-     A greater number was narrated from many of the salaf.

See al-Mughni, 2/604; al-Majmoo’, 4/32

3-     The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to pray eleven rak’ahs and make them very lengthy, so much so that it used to take him most of the night. Indeed, one night in which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) led his companions in praying Taraaweeh, he did not end his prayer until just before dawn, and the Sahaabah feared that they would miss suhoor. The Sahaabah (may Allaah be pleased with them) loved to pray behind the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and they did not feel that it was too long. The scholars thought that if the imam made the prayer so long, this would be too difficult for the members of the congregation and that might put them off. So they thought that the imam should make the recitation shorter and increase the number of rak’ahs.

The point is that the one who prays eleven rak’ahs in the manner narrated from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) is doing well and is following the Sunnah. Whoever makes the recitation shorter and increases the number of rak’ahs is also doing well. A person who does either of these two things is not to be denounced. Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah said:

If a person prays Taraaweeh according to the madhhabs of Abu Haneefah, al-Shaafa’i and Ahmad, with twenty rak’ahs, or according to the madhhab of Maalik, with thirty-six rak’ahs, or with thirteen or eleven rak’ahs, he has done well, as Imam Ahmad said, because there is nothing to specify the number. So the greater or lesser number of rak’ahs depends on how long or short the qiyaam (standing in the prayer) is.

Al-Ikhtiyaaraat, p. 64

Al-Suyooti said:

What is narrated in the saheeh and hasan ahaadeeth is the command to observe night prayers during Ramadaan, which is encouraged without specifying a particular number. It is not proven that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) prayed twenty rak’ahs of Taraaweeh, rather that he prayed at night, with an unspecified number of rak’ahs. Then he delayed it on the fourth night lest it become obligatory for them and they might not be able to do it. Ibn Hajar al-Haythami said: There is no saheeh report that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) prayed twenty rak’ahs of Taraaweeh. The narration which suggests that he “used to pray twenty rak’ahs” is extremely weak (da’eef).

Al-Mawsoo’ah al-Fiqhiyyah, 27/142-145

So you should not be surprised that people pray Taraaweeh as twenty rak’ahs. There have been generation after generation of those imams (who used to pray twenty rak’ahs), and all of them are good.

And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A