Tim Wise – Pathology of White Privilege

This is it… this is the video that finally helped me ‘get it’ when it came to the subject of white privilege a few years ago.

I know Tim Wise has done other later talks in more recent years, continues to address issues of race and inequality from a white perspective but this for me is my favourite, most powerful speech of his I’ve listened to. Maybe as it affected me so much.

And yes… I know he is a non-Muslim, and will occasionally say things as a Muslims we will not agree with but on the subject of racial inequalities, white privilege and the massive problems built up into modern day societies around  these issues he speaks the truth and we should respect that.

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3 thoughts on “Tim Wise – Pathology of White Privilege

  1. When I have to thank a white man for speaking on issues that have affected my quality of life, that I myself am a afraid of speaking about because I want to avoid the angry black person stereotype, that’s white privilege. When I and all of my black friends grew up being told to be extra careful of how we behave around white people, no matter our socioeconomic status, that is white privilege. When in grade school I began to alter the way I spoke, behaved, and what I listened to just to get better grades and be treated differently by my teachers, that’s white privilege. When my mother had to lie about how many children she had and who lived with her just to get a better apartment, that’s white privilege. When my mother began putting chemicals in my hair at age four to alter it, while white people can walk around with dreadlocks and not be bothered, that’s white privilege. When I get depressed about shopping at a grocery store in a mostly black neighborhood due to it’s lack of quality, that’s white privilege. When I took a group of kids from a mostly black school on a tour of my campus and took them in the library that had a scan detector I watched those kids get nervous about possibly being searched, while at all of the white schools I observed as an education major didn’t have one metal detector, that’s white privilege. When every school I went to was underfunded, had abusive teachers, and infestations of mice, that is white privilege. When I have had my body parts searched and essentially fondled by security guards at my high school from grade school until college, that’ white privilege.When I have to explain to a fellow classmate of mine that freedom did not come as a burden to freed slaves even though many died of disease and starvation, that is white privilege. When I have seen nearly every aspect of black culture since the transatlantic slave trade be laughed at and ridiculed until white people took it over, that is white privilege. When I can’t even tell my non black friends that the n word is offensive to me without them bringing up the opinion of another black person who agrees with them that’s black privilege. When white people can’t understand how affirmative action works, that’s white privilege. When white people become the faces of a movement that others have fought and died for, that’s white privilege.There is a lot of white privilege and in my relatively short twenty-two years on this planet I have experienced more than any white person will ever know.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I meant to say white privilege on this part. ” When I can’t even tell my non black friends that the n word is offensive to me without them bringing up the opinion of another black person who agrees with them that’s black privilege.”

      Liked by 1 person

    2. That is all true, however those blind to white privilege when they are saying “I just don’t get it, why are all these people angry for?”

      A white person can get through to them as they did with me. Can say more, be stronger in his words without those stereotypes popping into people’s minds and blocking these ideas being accepted.

      Yes that is also privilege, but it’s using it to put an end to it which is how I try to use my own privilege in my own limited way.

      Liked by 1 person

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